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Stop Adoption HPOZ Westwood Meeting

The Stop Adoption HPOZ Westwood Meeting was held June 30, 2016. This was the first meeting held in Westwood by a collective of Holmby Hills property owners who are against having a HPOZ enacted in Holmby Hills in Westwood or learning more about the proposals being made. Residents gathered who felt they had been misinformed, or not informed about the proposed adoption of a HPOZ for their neighborhood. The proposed Westwood Holmby Hills HPOZ will contain regulations specific to the neighborhood restricting building and remodeling within the community . In the future if you want to make changes to your home you would be subject to approval from the HPOZ. Some of the concerns brought up at the meeting are the possible restrictions ,color of your home, replacing windows, replacement of doors, tree’s and landscaping, room additions, 2nd story additions etc. With the proposed HPOZ you would not just go get a building permit, you would have to go through a process of approval through the city so that what you are doing will not go against the architectural history of the neighborhood. There are good reasons to retaining the character of a neighborhood and restrict overbuilding or building in bad taste but there are other ways to achieve this preservation IE: the BMO or baseline mansionization ordinance that is being reviewed and improved is being noted by those against the proposed HPOZ as sufficient way to help impose improvements and building restrictions . The committee against the HPOZ adoption feels it will be too restrictive and hard to ever undo and end. You can read more about all these points through some of the links attached to this article. I have written articles on the subject before. This meeting was the first public meeting held to Stop Adoption HPOZ Westwood. Click here to see a video of the meeting to learn more. Ben Reznik, Land use attorney spoke to the crowd of Westwood homeowners who had gathered to address the many questions neighbors had. There is a petition circulating against the HPOZ enactment and a committee e mail formed to get more information. (kittleholmbymember@outlook.com) The current proposed HPOZ can be read here. These are all very important links to understand the proposed HPOZ and the issues against the proposed HPOZ — see all the details proposed here.  This evening, July 14,2016 is the first meeting to discuss the HPOZ draft at St Albans Church.  The Stop Adoption HPOZ Westwood Meeting group will be present to ask many questions. The pros and cons of preserving the historic value of a neighborhood versus the freedom to choose what you want to do will be discussed at the meeting and secondary meeting on July 21,2016. There are many previous articles I have posted on the subject. Whether an HPOZ will help or hinder property values in the area will continue to be discussed. Other neighborhoods including Bel Air, Brentwood, Venice etc are all experiencing similar issues as growth and development, and remodeling will continue to present issues of preservation. There are so many issue discussed in the posted links so don’t miss the opportunity to view videos and important links

Caron Schwartz is  realtor who works in Holmby Hills and Westwood and has written many posts about the area which includes the Wilshire Corridor and Bel Air. Homes for sale in Westwood are affected by these decisions that are being made. Bel Air Real Estate is facing all the issues of HPOZ and Baseline Mansionization Act. There is currently a IOC in these areas.(Interim Control Ordinance).

For more information contact Http://www.caronschwartz.comStop Adoption HPOZ Westwood Meeting

Contemporary home Holmby Hills

HPOZ Opposition

New Construction in Little Holmby

New Construction in Little Holmby is increasing property value. Little Holmby is one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in Los Angeles to live in. Tucked  between Beverly Hills and the 405 Freeway, just next to UCLA, are the rolling hills and streets of Holmby Hills. Within this neighborhood there are so many different style homes and tree’s .It has remained a fairly quiet residential neighborhood surrounded by large high rises and many other communities. Westwood is neighbor to  beautiful neighborhoods like Bel Air, Brentwood, Cheviot Hills, Beverly Hills and Century City.  Westwood has within it several sub communities. Holmby Hills, containing Little Holmby, Westwood Hills, The homes South of Wilshire (that surround Fairburn Elementary) (and are undergoing many new homes being torn down and replaced alongside beautiful existing homes),  Comstock Hills, Homes near Westwood Charter. Homes in Westwood generally surround wonderful public schools that are just  one reason these communities are so desirable. If you want to buy a home in Los Angeles, these are great neighborhoods to consider. There are so many restaurants, theaters, museums, shopping, grocery stores, places of worship, parks etc. surrounding these communities.

Little Holmby is a great neighborhood to purchase a  home in Los Angeles. As with any neighborhood, older houses are often replaced with newer larger ones and alternatively homes are being remodeled. Today’s homeowner enjoys decorating and remodeling and enhancing the value of their home and environment. Westwood in general has continued to see a lot of tear down homes South of Wilshire and fewer North of Wilshire in Little Holmby. Due to recent implementation of ICO and HPOZ North of Wilshire in Little Holmby a moratorium is in place to restrict new construction while plans for a HPOZ are prepared and reviewed. This is a hot topic in the neighborhood. See some of my previous posts to learn more about Mansionization, ICO in Holmby Hills, HPOZ in Holmby Hills. There is a movement to retain the charm and quality of homes in the neighborhood which is good. Who makes the restrictions?, what they will be? and how they are enforced ?is still a work in progress. Neighborhoods and the City are engaged in these conversations throughout the city. Many in neighborhoods are just finding out details and unaware how the decisions will affect them. Therefore it is important to write about and talk about the many changes that could happen and get neighbors involved in shaping their communities.

Today’s article is to talk about some of the beautiful homes that were added to Little Holmby prior to the moratorium. As a real estate agent in the neighborhood, I can’t help but notice value’s climbing. New Construction in Little Holmby has added some interesting homes. I walk the streets and get to know the homes within the neighborhood. Over the years I note homes being enhanced whether it is remodeling, staging, additions, new construction etc. We have an assortment of Spanish, ranch, Colonial, Tudor, modern,Mid Century, etc homes in the neighborhood. Some on small lots, some on larger lots. Several pictures are included of new homes that were built over the last few years. I feel they have helped increase values in the neighborhood. Homes coming on the market today should be presented in their best form to achieve highest property values. Some homes are marketed as is to leave to the imagination enhancements the next buyer would like to do. Currently the question as to what residents will be allowed to do is being evaluated. It is important for residents to get involved in this process. While no one wants to see an eye sore in a neighborhood, thus far newer construction has added valuable homes. New contruction in Little Holmby has been a positive thing. While in the building stage these homes often seem large, once landscaping has been added , we now have higher priced real estate added to the neighborhood!!. I can see how this could be difficult if placed next to a very small home. Currently the possibility of not having new construction is possible? HPOZ can be a good thing, and it can be very restrictive so it is important for homeowners to make sure they are involved in the process that is taking place. Here are some examples of the beautiful( at least I think so) homes that were added to the neighborhood. While no one would want every home to be torn down and replaced by these large homes, there will need to be discussions to determine what will happen with this neighborhood.Many homes today that are sold have been remodeled with beautiful wood floors, updated kitchens, updated plumbing and electrical, basement rooms enhanced,outdoor spaces enhanced,and  bathrooms remodeled. Awareness and involvement is important. Please contact me for further information about homes in the area. There are three very important meetings that address the HPOZ issues coming up. Thursday June 30, 2016 Hillel House 574 Hilgard 7 p.m Community meeting. July 14, 2016 7-9 St Alban’s Episcopal Church. July 21,2016 6-7 and 7-9pm  St Alban’s Episcopal Church,

Let me help you find or sell your home. I would be happy to give you a market evaluation and advise you what you can do to enhance your home. Contact 310-383-0831  https://www.caronschwartz.com

Holmby Hills new construction enhances neighborhood

Holmby Hills new construction

Little Holmby Home

Little Holmby Home

Little Holmby Real Estate

Little Holmby Real Estate

 
New Construction in Little Holmby

New Construction in Little Holmby

New Construction in Little Holmby

New Construction in Little Holmby

New Construction Little Holmby

New Construction Little Holmby


Little Holmby homes listed over 4 and 5 million

Little Holmby homes listed over 4 and 5 million are becoming more common on the market recently. Little Holmby has always been one of the most desirable neighborhoods to live in Los Angeles. Due to great schools and central location this beautiful neighborhood with such a varied array of beautiful style homes has seen home prices of 2 and three million for years.  Many grand old homes on large lots are being remodeled and in some cases prior to the moratorium and HPOZ ICO rules being enforced, homes have been torn down and large new homes have been built. This seems to be a good thing for the neighborhood adding value to an already hot neighborhood . Little Holmby homes listed over 4 and 5 million includes more than 13 homes sold pending or active in the past 6 months! Beautiful interiors with systems that are updated and integration of indoor and outdoor space are some of the reasons the jump in prices is starting to be seen. People in Little Holmby held onto homes for a long time as families raised their children in the neighborhood . There are more homes coming onto the market recently.  My best advice if you have a home in Little Holmby and have thought of selling would be to upgrade the systems(plumbing, air conditioning, electrical). Talk with a realtor like myself about staging or preparing your interiors to get the best value for your sale. If you’re looking as a buyer for a home in the neighborhood we have seen more listings on the market in the past few years than ever before. There are currently some restrictions on tearing down homes and remodeling so you want to be informed about this. View some of the Little Holmby Homes listed  over 4 and 5 million. As you can see in pictures below, interiors look great and there is a flow with indoor and outdoor space. If you need a price consultation or assistance, contact 310-383-0831 https://www.caronschwartz.com

Little Holmby Dalehurst New Construction sold

Little Holmby Dalehurst New Construction sold

Little Holmby Sold Dalehurst

Little Holmby Sold Dalehurst

 

Holmby Hills Bedroom with outdoors

Holmby Hills Bedroom with outdoors

Holmby Hills Family room

Holmby Hills Family room

Holmby Hills bathroom

Holmby Hills bathroom

Holmby Hills bedroom

Holmby Hills bedroom

In Escrow Loring Little Holmby

In Escrow Loring Little Homby

Little Holmby Home on Malcolm

Little Holmby Home on Malcolm

Little Holmby Homes listed over 4 and 5 million

Little Holmby Homes listed over 4 and 5 million

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance (ICO) refers to the ordinance  put in effect in March of 2015. It was adapted as a urgency measure to limit and stop issuance of building permits for the construction of single family homes on RA,RE,RS and R1 lots in 15 designated areas, Holmby Hills being one of them. Proposed construction has to meet certain specific criteria. Ordinance 183497 has very specific guidelines residents and buyers looking to purchase homes in Holmby Hills must be aware of.In addition if you are considering selling your home you need to have awareness of the new restrictions. As a realtor and resident of Little Holmby, I get many inquiries from clients looking to buy or sell a home in the neighborhood. The prohibitions of the specific ordinance need to be read by potential sellers or buyers in the neighborhood. For approximately the next two years, the City will be working on a proposed HPOZ for the neighborhood and during that time, restrictions on what you can do are in place.

Given those guidelines, there is remodeling going on . The ordinance states:” The department of building and safety may review and approve the following types of exempt projects which do not require referral to the Planning Department:

1. Interior Remodeling of a legally constructed building or structure that does not change any exterior features(such as windows);

2. Additions of less than 250 sq ft that do not increase the height the structure and are located in the rear yard area:

3.Construction of gazebos,balconies,trellises,decks,or garden sheds in the rear yard area that are not visible from the street:

4.Seismic retrofitting,maintenance or repair of existing foundations with no physical change to the exterior;

5.Installation of rear yard swimming pools or spas;

6.Installation of rear or side yard fencing;

7.Re: roofing with no change in building materials;

8. Installation of solar energy systems, as defined by California Government Code Section 801.5;

9. Any construction for which a building permit or demolition permit is required to comply with an order issued by the Department of Building and Safety to repair, remove or

demolish an unsafe building or substandard condition, or to rebuild a structure destroyed by fire, earthquake or other natural disaster , provided that the development is not

prohibited by any other provision of the LAMC;
10. Issuance of a building permit for a project that satisfies all of the following conditions: 1)Architectural and structural plans sufficient for a complete plan check were accepted by
the Department of Building and Safety before the effective date of this ordinance, subject to the time limits set forth in Section 12.26.A.3 of the LAMC; 2) A project that had a plan
check fee was collected before the effective date of this ordinance; and 3) No subsequent changes have been made to those plans that increase or decrease the height, floor area or occupant load by more than five percent, that change the use, or that violate the Zoning Code regulations in effect on the date that the plan check fee was paid;
11. Construction, redevelopment, rehabilitation or renovation of multifamily housing. Multifamily housing includes two-family dwellings , multiple dwellings, group dwellings
and apartment houses. Projects that involve the demolition of existing multifamily housing and its replacement with single-family housing shall be prohibited.
I hope some of these major points in the ordinance assist you as you consider selling or buying a home in Holmby Hills. There are exceptions and hearing boards to discuss changes you want to make and if you require consideration for exceptions.
As a real estate agent living and working in the area I am informed about the kind of questions that are often asked.If you are looking to buy or sell a home in Holmby Hills, contact me for further information. Let’s work together sell your home or purchase a home in Holmby Hills. Westwood and Holmby Hills are  wonderful neighborhoods in Los Angeles. Holmby Hills is one of the nicest residential neighborhoods to live in . Holmby Hills is close to everything, has fantastic public schools, shopping, parks, places of worship and is surrounded by many neighborhoods and freeway access. I hope this gives you a bit of information about the Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance.http://zimas.lacity.org/documents/zoneinfo/ZI2443.pdf

quotes taken from L.A City ordinance number 183497

Holmby Hills ICO

Holmby Hills ICO

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance

Holmby Hills Interim Control Ordinance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Holmby Hills Mansionization

Holmby Hills has been working for over a year to develop a HPOZ. In Holmby Hills they have been  working to promote a movement to maintain and preserve the quality of homes in Holmby Hills and Little Holmby. Efforts to create a HPOZ have been underway for some time . Holmby Hills mansionization is a hot topic. The City council felt it is time to review the rules on building, remodelling, additions, tear down restrictions etc. Bel air is in desperate need of restrictions on building in the neighborhood. Holmby Hills mansionization has been on the forefront for a few years so they are recently a neighborhood considered along with approx 20 neighborhoods under review.

Quoted from PaulKoretz, there has been a temporary moratorium placed onHolmby Hills and the following areas to curbmansionization:

Holmby Hills mansionization

Holmby Hills mansionization

“Mansionization
Monday, Nov 17, 2014

Mansionization occurs when homes are torn down to make way for larger, indeed often enormous, boxy “McMansions.”  With these new mansions towering over surrounding homes, many local residents feel that the historical character of their neighborhood has been altered, perhaps even irreparably.  Some communities in particular have experienced a major loss of smaller, older houses, bought to be razed and replaced with newer structures occupying the maximum available lot space.

One of the key sources of abuse has been the so-called “bonuses,” enabling developers to build using an additional 20% more space.  These bonuses were adopted half a dozen years ago, when size limits based on lot size were being set for both new and renovated homes. Councilmember Koretz strongly believes that allowing such large bonuses has undermined the effort to protect neighborhoods from overdevelopment, and that’s why he’s calling for significant limits on such bonuses or their outright elimination, as part of the Council’s effort to pass a citywide mansionization ordinance.

Deliberations on how best to strengthen anti-mansionization regulations, including by tackling the problem of these large bonuses, won’t be completed quickly – complex issues and challenges are involved, and the process may take an estimated 18 months.  In the meantime, the city has agreed to take some swifter action to protect some of the most vulnerable neighborhoods from rampant out-of-scale development.

That’s why on November 4th, the City Council unanimously agreed to create rules that temporarily protect some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods from the flurry of demolition.  Those areas, to be protected through the establishment of an Interim Control Ordinance (ICO), include Sunset Square, Carthay Square, Holmby-Westwood, Oxford Square, El Sereno-Berkshire Craftsman District, South Hollywood, La Brea Hancock Neighborhood, North Beverly Grove, The Oaks, Valley Village, Faircrest Heights Neighborhood, Old Granada Hills Neighborhood, and Larchmont Village.  Under the ICO, various temporary remedies regarding tear-downs and replacement homes may be applied to these neighborhoods, to curtail large, out-of-scale development there, while we move toward adoption of a permanent, citywide ordinance.

These temporary measures will help neighborhoods knee-deep in mansionization, which is why neighborhood activist join with Councilmembers Koretz, Blumenfield, LaBonge and Krekorian in celebrating after the November 4th vote, but the long term solution will be through a citywide mansionization ordinance that recognizes the need for changing the current system of bonuses that encourages out-of-scale McMansions”  http://cd5.lacity.org/Get_Informed/CommunityNews/LACITYP_029419

Holmby Hills has been working to bring about a HPOZ  for over a year. Foreseeing Holmby Hills mansionization, restrictions on building have been undertaken for some time. Spear headed by Susan Ruben believes the HPOZ would help protect the character and architectural standards within the community. Bel Air which has been greatly affected by tearing down old homes and building huge new homes is now making efforts to develop a HPOZ. The difficulties in the neighborhoods arise when developers over build or build outside of city guidelines and styles that may not fit as others see fitting for the neighborhoods. The HWPOA has sued and cited builders in the neighborhood for not adhering to the original CC&R’s in the neighborhood and tried to curb inappropriate projects in the area. Holmby Hills has a mixture of many styles of homes, Tudor, Mediterranean, Mid Century, Ranch,Colonial, English Country, French Country, Spanish etc. Large homes are being torn down and remodeled as many of the homes are older in Holmby Hills.New kitchens, bathrooms, wood floors, plumbing replacements, etc are all common in the homes that are being redone. Some people feel the HPOZ will dictate what can be done. Others worry about not having the regulations as new homes tower over their homes or are very large. As a member of the community and realtor in the area Caron Schwartz has noted” there is a large increase in construction ,both remodeling and tearing down homes in the recent year that is increasing.” “People recognize what a special neighborhood Holmby Hills and Little Holmby and Bel Air are. The existing homes are being improved, or torn down creating larger homes. In Bel Air,there is concern for some large homes being built There are many homes that are older and are in need of updating. Holmby Hills and Bel Air are very unique neighborhoods. They are  neighborhoods close to so much that L.A has to offer, yet tucked away with some privacy and beautiful homes. There is tremendous opportunity to upgrade and improve the older homes in the areas.”Concern for Holmby Hills Mansionization and Bel Air Mansionization are hot topics.

So
“What is an HPOZ and how does it work?

A Historic Preservation Overlay Zone, or HPOZ, is an area of the city which is designated as containing structures, landscaping, natural features or sites having historic, architectural, cultural or aesthetic significance. To receive such designation, areas must be adopted as an HPOZ by the City Planning Commission and the City Council through a zone change procedure that includes notification of all affected and nearby property owners and public hearings. Once designated, areas have an HPOZ overlay added to their zoning, and are subject to special regulations under Section 12.20.3 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code. Each HPOZ area has a five member HPOZ Board to review and make recommendations on projects and promote historic preservation within the designated area. Most types of exterior changes or improvements to properties in an HPOZ area require written approval from the Planning Department.
What are the possible advantages of living in an HPOZ?
  • Control over inappropriate alterations: HPOZs offer one of the most effective tools to protect the unique historic exterior architectural character of neighborhoods. The HPOZ process ensures that proposals for exterior alterations, additions, and new construction in historic neighborhoods receive appropriate review and scrutiny. Designation as an HPOZ helps to ensure that the most distinctive, historic, and charming qualities of the neighborhood will be preserved.
  • Increase in property values: Numerous studies nationally have found that homes within historic districts such as HPOZs tend to appreciate in value at a higher rate than similar homes outside designated historic districts. Many homebuyers specifically seek out homes in unique historic neighborhoods and welcome the assurance that the qualities which attracted them to the neighborhood are more likely to endure over time.
  • Eligibility for property tax reductions: Under the Mills Act program, owners of “contributing structures” (those structures that were built during the predominant period of development in the neighborhood and that have retained most of their historic architectural features) are eligible to enter into a contract with the City that can result in substantial property tax savings.
  • Preservation expertise: The HPOZ Board, in addition to its formal role in reviewing process, can often serve as an informal source of technical expertise and guidance. Board members often offer property owners excellent advice on cost-effective ways to remodel their properties to maintain and enhance their historic character, and may even suggest local contractors and craftspersons who have worked on similar rehabilitation projects.
  • Enhanced sense of community: The HPOZ approval process can often bring a neighborhood together around a common source of pride: a neighborhood’s history and architectural character. The designation itself can help create a sense of identity among neighborhood residents and greater awareness of the neighborhood throughout the city.
What are the possible disadvantages?
Property owners should be aware that properties located within an HPOZ are subject to additional review processes. A property owner may need to make a presentation to their local HPOZ Board. Most types of exterior changes or improvements must be approved by the Department of City Planning: minor modifications may be approved very quickly, but more significant changes may be under review for up to 75 days. Projects that would degrade the historic character of the building or the neighborhood may not be allowed.
An HPOZ is also not the right tool for every neighborhood. Sometimes, neighborhoods become interested in achieving HPOZ status largely to stop out-of-scale new development. An HPOZ should not be seen as an “anti-mansionization” tool: other zoning tools may better shape the scale and character of new construction. An HPOZ is best utilized when a neighborhood has a cohesive historic character and community members have reached a consensus that they wish to preserve those historic architectural features.
What is the adoption process for a new HPOZ?
The process typically begins informally, at a grass-roots level, with a local neighborhood group organizing community meetings to explain to residents how the HPOZ process works and to gauge possible interest in creating an HPOZ. Community members often ask their City Council members for assistance, and most HPOZs are formally initiated by the City Council through a motion by the Councilmember of the district. Under the HPOZ Ordinance, the Director of the Planning, the Cultural Heritage Commission, or the City Planning Commission may also initiate an HPOZ. An HPOZ may also be initiated through a formal application by owners or renters within the district; in these cases only, the ordinance requires that signatures of at least 75% of owners or lessees be obtained.
Before an HPOZ may move into the formal adoption process, an historic resources survey of the proposed district must be prepared. The survey details the historic and architectural significance of the neighborhood and identifies structures and features as either “contributing” or “non-contributing” to the district. A contributing structure is a building that was constructed during the predominant period of development in the neighborhood and that has retained most of its historic features. A non-contributing structure is one that was either constructed after the major period of the neighborhood’s development, or has been so significantly altered that it no longer conveys its historic character.
Once the historic resources survey is completed, it is reviewed by Department of City Planning staff for completeness and accuracy. The Department of City Planning also holds public workshops and hearings in the community before taking the HPOZ through the adoption process. An HPOZ becomes effective only after the completed Historic Resources Survey is certified by the Cultural Heritage Commission. Because the HPOZ includes changes to zoning within the proposed area, it must be adopted as an ordinance by the City Planning Commission and the full City Council, following full public hearings.”            quoted from: http://www.preservation.lacity.org
To learn more about real estate in Bel Air and Holmby Hills , contact https://www.caronschwartz.com   http://www.housesinwestwood.com  http://www.realestateholmbyhills.com
310-383-0831 http://www.belairnewsletter.com
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History of Westwood Real Estate

History of Westwood

History of Westwood

 

History of Westwood , Westwood Village , Holmby Hills , UCLA land and Homes in Los Angeles

Westwood has a complex history but to give you a general idea of the development of Westwood it was planned during the 1920’s through the 1950s and involved thousands of acres that were Eleven development units. The Janss Investment Corporation created many of the great developments of Los Angeles

The History of Westwood Real Estate is very interesting. The area was originally owned by a Spanish soldier. The land was Ranch and farm land .In approx. 1884 some of the land was sold and the Government was deeded 300 acres for what is today the Veterans Administration. The Westwood Village Memorial Park cemetery is from this time period. In 1962 it became famous as resting place that now includes Marilyn Monroe, Dean Martin, Mel Torme, Darryl Zanick, Farrah Fawcett ,Natalie Wood, Jack Lemmon, Frank Zappa.The land was sold many times, partially to the Los Angeles Country Club, them to the Danziger family, and to Alphonso Bell who developed Bel Air.The History of Westwood Real Estate includes Holmby Hills Real Estate.

History of Westwood Real Estate

History of Westwood Real Estate

In 1919 land was sold by John Wolfskill to his heirs and Arthur Letts founder of The Broadway Dept Stores/Bullocks. Letts developed the area named “Holmby Hills”. Arthur Letts son in law Harold Janss and his brother Edwin Janss developed the Southern end Westwood Hills between Santa Monica and Pico. In the 1920’s Fox Studios purchased land. In 1925 the University of California purchased land. During this time the business and shopping district ”Westwood Village” was created along with residential communities . This area, neighboring UCLA was meant for a “high class residential community” .Holmby Hills was named after Arthur Letts estate in Hollywood and his family estate in Holdenby, England. The streets were named after English Locales.
Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Neil Diamond, Aaron Spelling, Frank Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, Hefner, Jane Mansfield ,Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwick, were all one time residents of the area
In 1955 the Janss brothers retired from developing Westwood and sold their remaining interests. South Westwood blvd by Pico running north was a business district. Emerson Junior high was opened on 10 acres of former Harold Lloyd Studio grounds In 1936 many buildings along Beverly Glen were developed. The Morman temple was also part of the Harold Lloyd grounds.

Westwood Hills as the neighborhood East of Veteran lying North of Wilshire and South of Sunset is comprised today of 607 single-family homes. Westwood Hills is to the West of UCLA. Its charming Montery style rolling hills are home to many faculty of UCLA, families attending Warner Ave Elementary, and legendary stars who found privacy in these charming streets.

The first residential subdivisions were sold around Santa Monica and Pico Blvd East of Sawtelle. Because there was already a community named Westwood in Northern California, the community was renamed Westwood Hills. In 1957 20th Century Fox president announced their real estate division would develop what is now Century City. In the late 1930’s there were scattered homes in the “Fox Hills unit “ by Century City. To the North of the Fox hills unit stretching to Beverly Hills high school was a golf course that became part of Fox Studios back lot. Sinai Temple was originally downtown and moved to Wilshire and Beverly Glen in 1960. The Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel was also purchased on Wilshire by Warner Ave at this time.

In the 1960 The first high rise was the Park Westwood Tower at Hilgard and Weyburn. More buildings continued after that along the Wilshire Corridor. Ships Coffee Shop was a popular Landmark and the Major theaters had opened in the 1960s on. The movie theaters brought shoppers so more stores started coming to Westwood. Ralph’s, Bullocks, Hamburger Hamlet, Contempo, Wil Wrights Ice Cream, Sears and Roeback, were all Landmarks in Westwood at different times. The History of Westwood is still evolving.  Contact me for further information

http://www.caronschwartz.com    310-383-0831